Was She Ever Lovelier? – Rita Hayworth (I)

As a sample of the large collection of images of Rita Hayworth that Ari Fontrodona collected during years, here are some of her favourites. All show dancing moments related to the film by William A. Seiter “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942 – Columbia Pictures), and all feature Rita with her dancing partner then: Fred Astaire.

First and second pictures were taken by John Florea in Hollywood, USA, in August 1941, during a publicity shot for the film, while she and Astaire performed “The Shorty George” number.

Pictures third to sixth seem to have been taken during another promotional session (or sessions) some time during 1942 (probably December, but I am not entirely sure).

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And lastly, this bonus in colour, capturing the pair practicing again the routine from the number “The Shorty George” on the Columbia Studios rooftop, on a sunny day.

It’s a joy to be able to see the actual colour of Rita’s dress (and socks!) in that scene of the film: a lovely pineapple yellow; with some very cute matching spectator shoes. We can also appreciate her beautiful red hair.

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Hayworth and Astaire – Promotional photo for “You Were Never Lovelier” (1942)

[© Earl Theisen, Getty Images]

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Yep. She was Lovely and Joyful indeed; few girls may be or have ever been lovelier! She was a perdurable referent for my sister, and I admire her very much too and also tried to copy one or two things from her these last years –moreover, she was a half-Romani girl :), one of our kindred (even if she very rarely spoke about her “gypsy” descent, and I suspect she did not feel proud about it…) and, since my sister learnt some tap dance exclusively inspired by her, and had posters of her at home, etc., I will lodge some more illustrated posts about Rita–Margarita Carmen Cansino in this blog soon.

(A last confidence: our Dad always vindicated Hayworth as the Loveliest actress and dancer in the world, and we were extremely influenced by our Dad.)

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You Were Never Lovelier (7) - adj2


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12 thoughts on “Was She Ever Lovelier? – Rita Hayworth (I)

  1. It’s nice for me to see people still appreciating the ‘old’ (vintage) great performers. As the years pass they are becoming more & more forgotten, as the people from their time pass on… and No, I’m not that old ! hahah… I’ve just always liked everything vintage since I was a child

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So we did… But I do not think of Rita Hayworth or Fred Astaire as “vintage” the same way that I cannot think my grandfather (who was more or less their age) was vintage :)) He was elegant and cultivated and, btw, very handsome ! he and my father listened to Bach and Beethoven as I do, and they are not at all vintage… Nobody since their times has composed better music. Same way Rita Hayworth was a lovely woman and dancer as very few now are or will be.
      I am 43 and I read Homer… LOL. Art and beauty never grow old…
      May I ask you how old are you, KTZ ? 50?

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I watched “Gilda” in my parents home, decades ago… I have to do it again, because I do not recall anything besides Hayworth’s amazing presence and s. a. Thanks a lot for the comment, Glenn 🙂 !

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  2. The Golden Age of Hollywood was amazing – watching those movies is comforting to me. The first one I saw was when I was 8 – The Maltese Falcon. Mum was sure I’d hate it – I fell in love with Bogie…

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    1. At eight!? With Humphey Bogart!? … Ha hah. Very curious! The first masculine movie star I liked deeply (beyond his performing talent), -and wetly!- but I did not confess it, was Burt Lancaster when we saw an old movie (for us) called The Unforgiven. I remember my mother praising him as irresistible, and I began to observe him attentively, and I felt a kind of blush on my face and in my chest, in unconscious agreement with my mother.

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    2. The other day I had cause to visit my local Post Office to collect a parcel.
      These days Post Offices are as much about presenting themselves as gift shops selling all manner of things as they are about providing mail services (at least here in Australia).

      As I stood in the lengthy cue that gradually inched it’s way closer to the counter, I passed a display box of DVD’s. One was a four-pack of Humphrey Bogart movies – ACROSS THE PACIFIC (1942), ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT (1942), BULLETS OR BALLOTS (1936) and DARK PASSAGE (1947). The price was right so coutesy of Australia Post I’ve now added ‘Humpy’ to my home film collection.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. It’s extremely interesting to me (also slightly puzzling) to realize how much liked and admired as a masculine sex symbol became Bogart! I’m not at all referring to his obvious talent as an actor (if a bit unidirectional) but to his appeal, because he leaves me just cold as a dead turkey… and not only because I like tall men! many women have told me he was SEXY, but I have never obtained a truly convincing explanation :)) As an actor, mainly in his collaborations with John Huston, I like him a lot, do not misunderstand me !

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  3. She certainly loved Rita. She sent me some videos of Rita dancing in her younger years when I first met Ari and we were talking about her Roma heritage. She was definitely a fan……

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    1. Yeah 🙂 I’ve seen these videos as well (many times)
      I have just blogged now a second set of photos with some added words on Rita that she posted on G+ already years ago :/ According to your own comments, oftentimes, to her and to me, I’m certain you will enjoy this new post on dancing and classic cinema

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